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Sugarman Group is proud to join the #IAmAndIWill campaign for World Cancer Day 2019.

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Health & Wellbeing Calendar 2019

Sugarman Occupational Health Services are pleased to share with you our Health & Wellbeing calendar for 2019. This calendar includes various health and wellbeing awareness days throughout 2019.

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What are your plans for 2019? New Year, New You?

Do you believe in New Year’s resolutions? Is it time for a new year, new you? We are hearing so much about not making resolutions but instead changing your way of thinking. At Sugarman, we are always looking at ways to change and improve so we thought you may like to see our top tips on being the best you in 2019.

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Do something amazing for the homeless this Christmas

Do something amazing this Christmas. Donate £5 and help make sure that homeless people have a hot meal and a present to unwrap.

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Sugarman Group Steps Up for the Homeless

Over 30 Sugarman Group staff members stepped out onto the streets of London in November to speak to homeless people and hand out care packages.

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Wellbeing In The Workplace

We take a look into the Education industry and the impact it is having on employee wellbeing.

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Winter Homeless Walk

Sugarman wants to help people fight homelessness.

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Health & Wellbeing Calendar 2018

A comprehensive Health & Wellbeing list of all awareness days throughout 2018.

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Focus on...EAP Services

Did you know...The UK Health and Safety Executive estimated that 31.2 million working days were lost due to work-related ill health and non-fatal workplace injuries in 2016/17 with each person on average taking off 23.8 days for stress, depression or anxiety. This month we focus on Employee Assistance Programmes (EAP Services) and how they could reduce work-related ill health issues in your business.

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Join the five million going dry this January

Thought about cutting down on your alcohol consumption? Wanting to take better care of your health and your body? Now is your chance.

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“Alcohol is the easiest substance to abuse because it is legal and available”

Alcohol Awareness Week 16th-20th November. ‘More than 9 million people in England drink more than the recommended daily limit’. Long-term alcohol use can cause serious health complications affecting virtually every organ in the body, it can also have a detrimental effect on a person’s career and finances as well as a negative influence on family and friends.

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Anti-Bullying Week 16th-20th November “What is Workplace Bullying?”

The term “workplace bullying” covers a wide range of circumstances such as health-harming mistreatment of one or more people which can include verbal abuse, offensive non-verbal behaviours, or interfering with someone’s ability to get work done. The effects of bullying does in fact cause a person to leave their job as it can result in constant depression and anxiety. An employee who feels undermined will have low morale, become stressed and likely to miss work because of health reasons, as bullying eventually takes it toll on the body.

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Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week 16th-20th November “Be Gas Safe Not Sorry”

Every year in the UK, over 200 people go to hospital with suspected carbon monoxide poisoning, which leads to around 40 deaths. Symptoms include: dizziness, vomiting, fatigue and confusion, stomach pain and shortness of breath. Employees need to be extra careful if they suspect carbon monoxide accumulation and to be alert to ventilation problems, particularly in enclosed areas where gases or burning fuels may be released.

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Diabetes Awareness Day - 14th November 2015 “Walk to Cure Diabetes”

Physical activity is an important part of the daily maintenance of glucose levels, as chronic inactivity leads to impaired glucose control. The consistent association between obesity and physical inactivity and increased prevalence of diabetes is disturbing, it is becoming a matter of “fitness versus diabetes” how many steps do you take a day?

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National Stress Awareness Day 4th November “For Fast-Acting Relief, Try Slowing Down”

A certain amount of stress is healthy when managed correctly but extreme and constant stress will have an emotional and physical impact on an individual - “stress goes to the weakest part of the body”. Money and work related issues are the most common reasons of stress and 60% of British adults say their life and circumstances are more stressful than they were five years ago.

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Mouth Cancer Has Grown By A Third In The Last Decade

Mouth cancer (awareness month November) can affect any part of the mouth including tongue and lips, it has grown by a third in the last decade and is anticipated to increase. Cancer of the mouth is twice as common in men as it is in women and is rare in people aged under 40; it is the 16th most common cancer in the UK (2011), accounting for 2% of all new cases. In males, it is the 12th most common cancer (3% of the male total), whilst it is 16th in females (1%).

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Men’s Health Awareness Month (November) - “A healthy outside starts from the inside”

Throughout the industrialised world women are living 5 to 10 years longer than men and it is a fact that men are more likely to develop heart disease 10 years before women. Generally, men have shorter life expectancies than women, and major causes of death include: heart disease; cancer, stroke, lung disease, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, kidney disease and suicide. However, these could be delayed or prevented by having regular check-ups.

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Lung Cancer Awareness Month (November) - World’s Biggest Cancer Killer

‘A cigarette is the only consumer product, which when used as directed kills its consumer.’ Lung cancer kills more than 35,000 people each year in the UK and fewer than 1 in 10 people diagnosed with the lung cancer survive for at least five years after diagnosis. Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer among men globally and smoking causes 90% of lung cancer cases.

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Dyslexia Awareness Week 2nd-8th November - Theme - “Making Sense of Dyslexia”

Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability and is defined as “specific learning disability that is neurological in origin.” Dyslexia can be grouped into 4 broad areas: problems with reading and writing; co-ordination problems; difficulty with short term memory and mixing up letters such as “b” and “d” as well as words.

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World Osteoporosis Day - Theme “Serve Up Bone Strength”

‘You need to bank calcium in the body to draw upon as you grow older’ look upon calcium as a reliable fund to ensure bone strength because weak bones are more likely to fracture. Also a sedentary lifestyle encourages the loss of bone mass but regular exercise can reduce the rate of bone loss.

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National Arthritis Week 12th -18th October 2015

One in five of the adult population in the UK has arthritis; there are also 12,000 children with arthritis and approximately 27,000 people living with arthritis are under the age of 25.

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World Arthritis Day 12th October - Arthritis is the biggest cause of pain and disability in the UK

Cases of osteoarthritis in the UK will double to over 17 million by 2030, as over half of the UK population will be aged 50 or older and nearly the same proportion will be overweight.

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Bipolar Awareness Day 6th October 2015 - What is Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy and ability to function. Suicide is the number one cause of premature death among people with bipolar disorder, with 15 percent to 17 percent taking their own lives as a result of negative symptoms that come from untreated illness.

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‘Electronic Society Means Sitting Disease - Increased Sedentary Work - Bad for the Back’

Back Care Awareness Week (5th - 11th October) - ‘Back pain is a product of a person’s environment, workstation and sitting habits. Poor posture increases fatigue, will cause discomfort and eventually injury.’

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National Cholesterol Month (October 2015) - ‘The Great Cholesterol Challenge’

High blood cholesterol is one of the major risk factors for heart disease and today heart disease accounts for greater than 45% of all deaths - nevertheless 75% of people who have heart attacks have normal cholesterol levels. Why is it important to understand cholesterol?

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Work-life balance is a two way street

Life itself is a balancing act - juggling work demands is tiring as well as stressful and brings lower productivity, sickness, and absenteeism, so work-life balance is an issue for all employees and all organisations.

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National Work Life Week

National Work-Life Week will focus on the importance of work-life balance and general well-being of employees so that they may become more enthusiastic and productive at work.

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The “Cognitive Intrusion of Work”

Work-life balance means different things to different people, it is not a one size fits all solution.

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Work-life initiatives create positive employer branding

Work-life initiatives create positive employer branding and promote being an employer of choice. Research indicates that company commitment to work-life initiatives is closely aligned with employee motivation and productivity.

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‘Success is never final and failure never fatal’

The demand for greater work-life balance is expected to increase over the next decade The Millennial generation entering today’s workforce are attracted to companies with policies promoting work-life balance as they are unwilling to sacrifice their personal lives for excessive work demands.

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Problem Spillover - Effects of Stress

Work stress can come from a variety of sources and affect people in different ways. Finding a healthy balance between work-life and home life will lead to better management of stress.

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Stoptober- Facts about smoking Infographic

The Public Health England 'Stoptober' campaign aims to help 250,000 people quit smoking this October. Read more about the dangers of smoking in our engaging infographic.

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Display Screen Assessments for Laptops

A laptop is not covered by these Regulations due to the fact that under these Regulations the keyboard shall be tiltable and separate from the screen so as to allow the user to find a comfortable working position, which avoids fatigue in the arms or hands.

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Display Screen Assessments- Importance of a good chair

Experts state that the chair is perhaps the single most relevant component of a healthy working environment. The lumbar support should fit comfortably into the curve of the lower back and feet should be flat on the ground.

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Elements that can aid DSA

No single continuous period of work at a screen should, in general, exceed one hour after this time a short break is essential and a short frequent break is more beneficial than taking a longer break.

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Conditions that impact RSI in the body

Tears of the Menisci – common in men who work in a squatting position Injuries of the menisci are common in men under the age of 45 (very typical in sports people or men whose occupation demands substantial kneeling). A tear is usually caused by a twisting force with the knee semi-flexed or flexed.

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RSI ‘Tennis Elbow’

Tennis elbow can be caused by playing tennis or any other physical activity which places repeated stress on the elbow joint and consequently a person develops a repetitive strain injury.

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Baker’s elbow also known as Student’s elbow – clinically referred to as Olecranon Bursitis

This is a condition characterised by pain, redness and swelling around the olecranon, caused by inflammation of the elbow's bursa.

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Smoking Cessation

Mark Twain said, “Quitting smoking is easy. I’ve done it a thousand times". Do people really understand the significant health risks of smoking not only to themselves but also to the people around them and why do they find it so difficult to quit? Because they are addicted to nicotine and their bodies are demanding that they smoke. Therefore, emphasis must be on motivation and helping to teach a smoker how to quit and then how to stay off.

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Passive Smoke

Smokers are not the only people affected by tobacco smoke; thus non-smokers increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20% to 30% and heart disease by 25% to 30% when they are exposed to passive smoke. Passive smoke is a serious health hazard for non-smokers, especially children. Non-smokers who have high blood pressure or high blood cholesterol have an even greater risk of developing heart diseases when they are exposed to passive smoke.

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Quitting – Why do people find it so hard to quit smoking?

Smoking is an addiction that comes from nicotine, the addictive in cigarettes. Quitting is difficult because withdrawal symptoms cause people to experience tension, anxiety and irritability this is because nicotine can help people feel calmer, causing temporary feelings of relaxation as well as reducing stress.

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Smoking and blood sugar levels are interrelated

Nicotine causes the body to release satisfying levels of sugar into the bloodstream far faster than eating, therefore a person trying to quit smoking must have some sugary snacks, because results of low blood sugar levels in quitting nicotine addicts are responsible for some of the most difficult withdrawal symptoms. Sugar is a key element in the chemical reaction of smoking that causes a smoker to feel “high”.

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Professional Help to Quit Smoking

The NHS offer programmes to quit smoking. A person is more likely to stop smoking with an NHS Stop Smoking Service rather than trying to stop smoking without help. Programmes offer tailored support with treatments such as Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and Champix.

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A major sign of a nation's overall wellbeing is the diet of its population

The Netherlands is the best place in the world to eat, according to new research. It is the highest rated country for a balanced healthy diet with only 6.3% of the population reported to have diabetes.

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Health Eating- You are what you eat

When a person follows a healthy diet their body will naturally reap the benefits. For example, when you eat fruits, starchy vegetables and whole grains throughout the day you keep your body fuelled and your blood sugar level on an even keel. Eliminating junk food and choosing healthier options helps you maintain a healthy heart, strong muscles and an acceptable weight.

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Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Workforce

According to the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health an estimated 439,000 workers in Great Britain suffered from musculoskeletal disorders during 2011/12 that were caused or made worse by their current or past work.

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Is the older worker more vulnerable to WMSDs?

Health is influenced by numerous other factors, particularly lifestyle and amount of exercise and nutrition.

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Evaluation of work musculoskeletal disorders & common MSD’s

The evaluation of WMSDs includes identifying workplace risks and evaluation begins with a general conversation about a person's employment and requires a detailed description of all the processes involved in a typical workday.

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Back Injury

The most common causes of back pain are strained muscles or ligaments and general constitutional degenerative changes ‘wear and tear’.

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Classification of Disorders of the Spine

Deformities of the spine: • Scoliosis • Kyphosis • Lordosis

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Mechanical Derangement of the Spine: Spondylolysis; Spondylolisthesis and Spinal Stenosis

Spondylolysis – in spondylolysis there is a defect in the neural arch of the fifth lumbar vertebra. Aching may be relieved by a surgical corset.

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Repetitive Strain Injury

In recent years it is computer operators, typists, musicians and people doing repetitive tasks in factories who most commonly develop RSI. Initially symptoms may only occur whilst a person is carrying out the repetitive task and ease off when they rest.

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Forearm, Wrist and Hand (Repetitive Strain Injury)

In the treatment of hand disorders resulting from RSI the primary emphasis should always be on restoration of function.

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Arthritis of the Wrist and Hand (can be precipitated by RSI)

Rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist and hand, affected joints are swollen from synovial thickening and movement is restricted.

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Diseases caused by RSI

Certain tendons are prone to rupture; thus the extensor tendon of a finger is easily torn from its insertion into the distal phalanx by sudden forced flexion of the finger.

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The most common types of repetitive strain injuries are tendinitis and bursitis.

Bursitis relates to inflammatory lesions of soft tissue. Inflammation may occur in a normally situated bursa or in an adventitious bursa.

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Shoulder Region – (typical area for RSI)

The shoulder region comprises three components: The gleno-humeral joint; the acromio-clavicular joint and the sterno-clavicular joint.

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Fats and your body

When the number of calories you eat exceeds your daily energy requirement, the excess is stored as fat. Fat is stored in the form of fatty acids called triglycerides and triglycerides are stored within a cell and when the amount of fat inside the cell expands, increasing the cell's diameter, then that part of the body begins to look fat.

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Dangerous Substances in the Workplace

Identifying which chemicals cause which cancers is one of the world’s greatest scientific challenges. People are exposed to trace amounts of many chemicals on a daily basis. These everyday exposures are usually too small to cause health problems.

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Occupational Health Insight

Occupational health and safety services are required across all industries to ensure that workers are not in danger in their workplace.

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Allied Health Services Insight

A brief glimpse into the Allied Health Services in the UK, including future trends.

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Occupational Health Current & Future Trends

As the UK’s workforce becomes older more people will be vulnerable to health effects as a result of work, many will have multiple issues and conditions that will have a significant impact on their capability to work. Although, on the whole working environments have become much safer as increased legislation has significantly minimised the amount of injuries, rising levels of stress with increased depression in working life is causing much concern.

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Stress Management

How to cope with stress at work ...

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Remove Stress

If you sleep like a baby – meaning you wake up crying every two hours – forget the dummy and warm milk.Take steps to eliminate the stress and anxiety that keeps you awake.Try a few of these...

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TIme Management

Good time management is essential for coping with the pressures of modern life without too much stress.

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Top 10 Stress Busters

What's making you stressed?

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Why is Occupational Health Important?

The whole objective of Occupational Safety and Health is to prevent diseases, injuries, and deaths that are due to working conditions; no one should have to suer a job related injury or disease because of their employment.

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RSI in Knees and Thighs

There are many issues and disorders that can affect RSI in knees and thighs. Read more to learn about the key issues in this area.

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Display Screen Assessments

Ergonomics is the science concerned with the fit between workers and their work environment and the two major issues an employer has with workstations is staying legal and reducing absenteeism due to workstation injury.

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RSI may be divided into two main categories

Type 1 RSI This includes well-defined syndromes such as: • Carpal tunnel syndrome (pain and squashing (compression) of a nerve in the wrist). • Tendonitis (inflammation of a tendon). • Tenosynovitis (inflammation of a tendon sheath).

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Amino Acids

Amino acids are responsible for strength, repair and rebuilding inside your body. Your tissues, your cells, your enzymes and your brain all get their nourishment and protection from amino acids.

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Housemaid’s Knee – Common Repetitive Strain Injury

The name derives from housemaids who were often required to be in the kneeling position for long periods of time while scrubbing floors, but with modern devices it is now much less of an occurrence in women.

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